Can You Believe It’s a Law? January 2014 Issue

gavelFew will argue that the law is necessary, maintaining order and ensuring fair treatment as a way to protect every member of society. However, even in this modern-day world with so many advances, many of the laws in existence have not caught up with the times. Take a look at some of the bizarre or comical laws that are still on the books across the nation.

Think Twice About Children Before Marriage in Mississipi
Parents of illegitimate children beware if you live in the state of Mississippi. You can get away with having a little one out of wedlock once. Shame on you if it happens again. According to law 97-29-11, if you are caught becoming the parent of an illegitimate child on more than one occasion, you will spend at least one month of your life in jail. You could sit tight for up to 90 days and have a fine to pay as well. The strangest part about this law is it allows this misdemeanor to happen once before there are consequences.

Drink Up, But Only One at a Time in Hawaii
If you are planning on getting smashed at a bar in Hawaii, you can’t be a two-fisted drinker. The moment you ask for two drinks at one time, you’ll be asked to prove who is having the second drink. Only one for you and then you’ll have to make return trips. However, there’s no limit to your single drinks so you should still be able to achieve your goals. It just might take a little longer.

Ladies in Vermont: If You Want False Teeth, Get it in Writing
Vermont has an absurd law concerning dentures that few may be aware of when they take a trip to the dentist’s office. It’s particularly troubling for wives should anyone decide to enforce the law. Mainly, it boils down to the fact that women are supposed to get permission from their husbands before they can actually put their dentures in their mouth. They should have documentation before they sport their pearly whites.

Blue and Ducklings Don’t Match in Kentucky
Head to the state of Kentucky for a oddball law about ducklings. It specifically targets anyone who would dream of coloring a duckling blue and putting it up for sale. This is tricky business. It’s only legal if more than a half dozen ducklings are a part of the transaction at one time.

Don’t Set Sail for Too Long in Georgia
If you plan on living on a boat while in the state of Georgia, think again. According to O.C. G. A. 12-5-282, you only have 30 days to stay afloat. It doesn’t matter if you are simply stopping over while on your journey around the world in 80 days. Whether you are a visitor or a full-time resident, make sure you set anchor and get off on the 31st day or travel on to your next destination.

Watch that Sweet Tooth in Idaho
Few Romeos may be aware of this obscure law that is still on record in the state of Idaho. It’s probably not a problem for most, but could be a concern on Valentine’s Day. When that special time of year arrives, men need to pay close attention to the weight of their sweets. They would be surprised to know that all gifts to their ladies should be at least fifty pounds. Anything less is against the law. It would appear that this law isn’t being enforced. Otherwise, this would be the candy capial of the world.

Shoot a Dog in Nevada and the Perpetrator Will Hang
While most probably don’t know about this law, and surely few are acting on it, serious consequences can befall anyone who shoots a dog on personal property. The owner of the dog and property has the legal right to string the offender up and hang him or her on the spot.

Don’t Drink and Mine in Wyoming
Hunt through the laws on record and you’ll find one of particular concern for anyone planning on getting drunk while mining in the state of Wyoming. If you happen to be caught with the bottle in your hand while you’re in the depths of the mine, it’s a serious offense. You could be sent to jail, do not pass go, for up to a year of your life! If you have to get drunk, stay home.

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